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“Emigration is continuing to go on still to a fearful extent.”

On May 14, 1863 John Murphy, from the Copper Works, Brass and Bell Foundry in Dublin, Ireland  wrote to Bishop John Thomas Mullock, the R.C. Bishop of Newfoundland to acknowledge receipt of payment for bells crafted for the Roman Catholic Cathedral in St. John’s (now Basilica). John Murphy was a Coppersmith who established his business…

Why celebrate mass in the hills?

On April 13, 1829 a significant milestone in Irish history was reached when King George IV reluctantly gave royal assent to the Roman Catholic Relief Act. This Act effectively removed a series of laws known as Penal Laws or Popery Laws that severely limited the ability of a Catholic to do anything. Some of the…

An Irish organist goes home

  On March 24, 1878, Thomas Mullock, brother of Bishop John Thomas Mullock of St. John’s, Newfoundland died at Clonmel, Ireland. Thomas’s claim to fame was that he was the first organist at the Roman Catholic Cathedral (now Basilica) of St. John the Baptist in St. John’s. Thomas an accomplished organist in Limerick, Ireland came…

What happened to Sheelagh’s Day?

In Newfoundland and Labrador there has been a long established tradition to refer to the day following St. Patrick’s Day (March 17) as  Sheelagh’s Day.  As early as 1819, the Anglican Missionary and historian Lewis Anspach who wrote the first general history of Newfoundland that was published stated: “It is hardly in the power of…

The Irish celebrate, in word and song.

“Newfoundland Writing,  A diversity of genre” On Sunday March 16 at the Holiday Inn  at 2:00 p.m. the Irish Newfoundland Association is very happy to present another FREE event  “Newfoundland Writing,  A diversity of genre”  with  readings from novelist Claire Wilkshire, writer /journalist Marjorie Doyle and poets Mary Dalton and James Langer.   The Finale…

Irish Week and Irish Farms in Newfoundland

Irish Farms in Newfoundland The Irish Newfoundland Association (INA) invites you to look at Irish Farming culture in Newfoundland as part of their ‘Irish Week’ presentations. In the first colony-wide census of Newfoundland in 1836, there were over 350 farms on the fringe of St. John’s; the majority established by settlers from the Irish counties….

INA Lecture March 12 at the Holiday Inn

The Irish Newfoundland Association invites you to join us for the first event of Irish Week.  The Irish Newfoundland Association is proud to present “A North Atlantic Musical Duet: Interactions between Newfoundland and Irish Musicians”   This talk explores how Irish music came to be seen as integral to Newfoundland music.  Rather than a direct link…

Irish Week Plans for INA

Irish Week Plans for INA (St. John’s) The Irish Newfoundland Association (INA) have finalized the schedule for ‘Irish Week’  and it promises  to offer much to members and friends of the association. The organization which is in the process of rebuilding after being in hibernation for several years has been actively recruiting new members and…

“Irish Week” plans taking shape

Irish Week plans taking shape (St. John’s) The Irish Newfoundland Association (INA) will be revitalizing the tradition of ‘Irish Week’ events in March and are asking members and friends to keep their calendars free for some great Irish history, music, and stories. The ‘Irish Week’ tradition was originally established with the founding of the organization…

Irish Reader at SPARKS Literary Festival, 2014

(St. John’s, NL) The celebrated Irish poet Patrick Cotter will be one of a number of readers at the SPARKS Literary Festival, 2014.  Cotter is available to the festival because of collaboration with the Irish Newfoundland Association. Patrick Cotter was born in Cork, 1963. Cotter was educated at University College Cork where he revived the…

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